About Us

We are a group of leading experts in the psychology of behaviour in disasters, collective behaviour and public order. Our aim is to empower individuals, communities and institutions to manage crisis by drawing upon powerful perspectives from social psychology research.

OR

As leading experts in the psychology of behaviour in disasters, collective behaviour and public order we study the way groups and crowds work. Our research positively informs individual, group and institutional response to crises.

Professor Stephen Reicher
Bishop Wardlaw Professor
School of Psychology and Neuroscience
University of St Andrews
@reicherstephen

Quote about social psychology and COVID-19. About 45 words. The way we deal with the coronavirus is bound up with the way we think about society and about the individual. And the problem is that we are in danger of getting it wrong on all counts, with the consequence.

Key focus areas, research impact and knowledge exchange

Broadly – the issues of group behaviour and the individual-social relationship. More specifically, my recent research can be grouped into three areas. The first is an attempt to develop a model of crowd action that accounts for both social determination and social change. The second concerns the construction of social categories through language and action. The third concerns political rhetoric and mass mobilisation – especially around the issue of national identity. Currently, I am starting work on a Leverhulme funded project (jointly with Nick Hopkins of Lancaster University) looking at the impact of devolution on Scottish identity and social action in Scotland.

Key resources from Stephen Reicher

Professor John Drury
Director of Research and Knowledge Exchange
School of Psychology
University of Sussex
@ProfJohnDrury

Quote about social psychology and COVID-19. About 45 words. The way we deal with the coronavirus is bound up with the way we think about society and about the individual. And the problem is that we are in danger of getting it wrong on all counts, with the consequence.

Key focus areas, research impact and knowledge exchange

Biography

I completed my first degree at the University of Sussex, and my MSc and PhD at the University of Exeter. I have also studied and worked at the University of Amsterdam, the University of Abertay Dundee, and the Trust for the Study of Adolescence. I came back to Sussex in 1998.

Role

I am Director of Research and Knowledge Exchange in the School of Psychology. I am convenor for the following modules: Psychology of Crowds and Collective Action and Discourse Analysis for Psychology (mini-module). I am also a UCU rep for Psychology.

Community and Business

My research on mass emergency behaviour is used by the Fire & Rescue Service (National Resilience), the Department of Health, and crowd safety managers. A United Nations Office for Disaster Reduction case study, based on my research, can be found here.  Since 2011, I have convened a CPD course on the Psychology of Crowd Safety Management for live event safety professionals. I have also worked with government agencies, crowd safety organizations, and arts, theatre and community groups. These include Public Health England, Square Metre Crowd Safety, the Event Safety Institute,  the Emergency Planning College, Fabrica Gallery, NixonMcInnes, Club Penguin, The Fusebox, Pure360, Salon, and the Bank of Ideas. I was a 2018 finalist in the ESRC Impact awards (Public Policy). For further details of my Community and Business links, see Impact & Influence

Key resources from John Drury

Professor Clifford Stott
Dean of Research
School of Psychology
Keele University
@cliffordstott

Quote about social psychology and COVID-19. About 45 words. The way we deal with the coronavirus is bound up with the way we think about society and about the individual. And the problem is that we are in danger of getting it wrong on all counts, with the consequence.

Key focus areas, research impact and knowledge exchange

I am currently a Professor of Social Psychology, Dean for Research in the Faculty of Natural Sciences, and Director of the Keele Policing Academic Collaboration (KPAC), one of Keele’s Strategic Research Centres. I joined Keele in March 2016 from a position as Principal Research Fellow in Security and Justice in the School of Law at the University of Leeds. I have an interdisciplinary focus and specialize in understanding the nature and role of social identity processes and intergroup relationships in the psychology and dynamics of crowd behaviour, ‘riots’, ‘hooliganism’ and ‘public order’ policing. I have held Lectureships and Senior Lectureships at the Universities of Bath, Abertay Dundee and Liverpool. I have also held Visiting Professorships at Aarhus University in Denmark, at the Leeds University Business School along with Visiting Fellowships and Scholarships at the Australian National University, the University of Exeter and Flinders University in Adelaide. I have been an Associate Editor for the British Journal of Social Psychology and currently sit on the Advisory Board of the journal Policing and Society. I have been a Consultant Editor for the British and the European Journals of Social Psychology and sat on the Editorial Board of Criminology and Criminal Justice. I have been a guest Editor of a special edition of Contemporary Social Science and Co-Editor of a special issue of Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice on the policing of crowds. I have been involved both as principle and co-investigator in research and consultancy projects worth in excess of £5 million provided by a wide range of organisations including the ESRC, Leverhulme Trust, the European Commission, UK Home Office as well as charitable foundations and a number of policing and other governmental organisations. I have recently concluded a collaborative ESRC funded project researching the social psychological dynamics of the spread of collective violence during the 2011 English ‘riots’ (ESRC ES/N01068X/1). I am currently the Principal Investigator of an ESRC funded project exploring the social psychology of everyday police citizen encounters (ESRC ES/R011397/1). I am also the Director of ENABLE, a project constructing an evidence-based approach to the policing of football crowds funded by the English Football League. My research and its associated theory have high-level external impact at a national and international level. It has informed policy, guidance and practice in the management of crowds for a range of government and police organisations in the U.K. including the Home Office, the Association of Chief Police Officers, the College of Policing, Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of the Constabulary as well as among others the Metropolitan Police Service, Staffordshire, Sussex and West Yorkshire Police. My research has also achieved high-level international impact affecting policy and guidance on the policing of crowds of the European Council, the European Union as well as a range of police forces globally including Portugal, Sweden, Denmark and Australia. In 2004 I was involved in the developing of the policing approach for the 2004 UEFA European Championships in Portugal and between 2009 and 2011 I played a central role in designing and delivering the Pan European Football Police Training Project funded by the European Commission in partnership with UEFA. In 2014 I was awarded the Economic and Social Research Council’s ‘Celebrating Impact’ First Prize and in 2015 my work on policing crowds was acknowledged by the ESRC as one of its ‘Top 50’ achievements in its 50-year history.

Key resources from Clifford Stott